Kids and Sports: How Much Is Too Much? | Psychology Today

Kids and sports: “Are kids being over-coached?”

I decided to do some research this morning, hence me sharing this article, after recently pondering that my 15-year old daughter is quite possibly doing too much lacrosse. I’m a big believer that there needs to be balance… And unfortunately, it seems her dad and I are slowly-but-surely losing sight of this. As with everything in life, balance is important!

Even though my daughter has not yet sustained any sports-related injuries, it blows my mind the amount of young clients I’ve seen in my office over the past eight years of practice. Many of them come to me now for maintenance, but most originally first came in for somewhat debilitating repetitive-use injuries (some straight up debilitating); usually affecting the hips, legs, low back, and/or shoulders.

“Kids’ sports have gotten out of control.”

As an example, a client of mine had to quit playing high school softball after exploratory surgery found a labrum tear. Without going into detail, her coach definitely over-coached her. It was my understanding she was expecting to get a scholarship for college, but that quickly became a pipe dream and it was devastating for her. So sad.

At 41, I simply do not remember this sort of thing being an issue during my childhood years. And at what point is enough enough?

Check out the source link below, and let’s try to remember…

“… maintaining a healthy body and a clear perspective is key. Encourage kids and teens to strive for balance.”

At any rate, I know it’s time for me to start setting limits for my teenager. Fingers crossed it all goes well!

As always, I hope you find this information informative!

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“Neutral balance alignment is key to becoming pain free!”™ ~ Me

Source: Kids and Sports: How Much Is Too Much? | Psychology Today

Do You Clench And/Or Grind Your Teeth?

Back in June of this year, I wrote a post on TMD: Temporomandibular Disorder, specifying causes and symptoms related to temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction. This post will be about clenching and grinding, and the effects it can have on your jaw and teeth. Keep in mind that I am obviously not trained in dentistry, which is why I will publicize a top-notch dentist in my area; one that I have been going to for years, and refer my clients to when the need arises. More on him later though.

Clenching and grinding, also known as bruxism, has caused some problems for me over the years. Not only has it seriously affected the musculature around my jaw, it has also given rise to non-natural contours and slight fracturing in my teeth.

Bruxism can be defined as either diurnal or nocturnal: diurnal is during the day, often stress related and easier to treat; nocturnal is at night, not under conscious control, which in turn can be a devastating habit causing great pain in the TMJ and also ruin the teeth.

Sleep bruxism often exerts remarkably powerful forces on teeth, gums, and joints. One estimate puts it at three times the forces generated during chewing (Castaneda, 1992, p. 46), while another puts it at ten times, powerful enough to crack a walnut. — Dr. Moti Nissani, 2000

According to the link directly above, Dr. Nissani also states that bruxism may lead to the following…

  • Sensitive, worn-out, decayed, fractured, loose, or missing teeth (McGuire and Nunn, 1996).
  • Broken down enamel, and in long-term bruxers, may reduce teeth to stumps.
  • Yellowish and softer dentin as opposed to white enamel cover.
  • The back teeth losing their cusps and natural contours; instead of appearing flat, they look as if they were worked over with a file or sandpaper.
  • Bridges, crowns, root canals, implants, partial dentures, and even complete dentures.

By 40 or 50 years of age, most bruxers . . . have worn their teeth to the degree that extensive tooth restorations must be performed. — Christensen, 1999

Now back to the AWESOME dentist I briefly mentioned at the beginning of my post. Dr. Alex M. Della Bella has been my dentist for 10+ years; helping me with anything from shaping my somewhat jagged-edged front teeth to making an occlusal guard for the clenching and grinding. In addition to me treating my own “adaptively shortened” jaw muscles intra-orally to help with TMD related pain (I’m trained in that), I can’t express enough how much an occlusal guard has helped me in preventing further damage to my pearly whites—those coming to fruition via the ZOOM! In-Office Whitening process.

Dr. Alex Della Bella: The official dentist to the Cincinnati Red’s

If you live in Cincinnati, Ohio—or the surrounding areas—and feel you suffer from bruxism, I highly recommend you contact Dr. Della Bella’s office at 513.793.1977 for support in getting things under control. You can also request an appointment directly through this link. If you’re looking for other dentistry services, Dr. Della Bella also specializes in the following…

  • Cosmetic Dentistry – Tooth Bonding, Porcelain Veneers, Whitening, Tooth Jewelry, ZOOM! In-Office Whitening
  • Restorative Dentistry – Crowns, Partial Crowns, Tooth Colored Resin Restorations
  • Preventative Dentistry – Athletic Mouthguard, Fluoride, Fluoride Varnish, Occlusal Guard, Oral Hygiene Instruction, Routine Maintenance, Sealants, Velscope Oral Cancer Examination
  • Sports Dentistry – Athletic Mouthguard, Injury Management Card, Pro Football Program, Traumatic Injury Management, Under Armour Performance Mouthwear
  • Sleep Disorder Management – Tap Appliance, Somnomed Appliance
  • Reconstructive Dentistry – Fixed Replacement of Missing Teeth (Bridges), Full and Partial Removable Dentures, Implants
  • Orthodontics – Invisalign
  • Periodontal Therapy – Arestin, Oraqix, Scaling and Root Planing, Soft Tissue Management

In closing, between Dr. Della Bella’s 25+ years in the dental field, and mine—hmmm… only about five years ;-)—in advanced soft tissue therapy for TMJ pain and dysfunction, I feel we make a great team in helping people manage their pain and dysfunction related to TMD. Here’s what he has to say…

Temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction is best handled in a very conservative manner by competent, experienced professionals.  When an experienced dentist teams up with an experienced therapist, like Nicole, the level of success attained is usually enhanced because the problem can be addressed using various, conservative methods.

As always, I hope you find this information informative!

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“Neutral balance alignment is key to becoming pain free!”™ ~ Me

What About Massage Interests You?

Keeping up with a blog—posting at least once a week was my goal—is sometimes difficult for yours truly. There are so many things I could write about with regards to massage, but picking and choosing what I think may interest you is more of a challenge than I originally thought it would be.

I was recently told by a long-term client that she believes I have some perfectionist tendencies. Hahaha… I think I just proved her correct. 😉

Anyway, I will continue to go-with-my-flow by writing about what interests me, but please tell me what about massage interests you by taking a few seconds to complete my poll; your opinion matters!

UPDATE AS OF 10/11/12: I moved the poll to my blog’s sidebar.

 

Did You Know…

That Ohio was the first state to license the practice of massage, and the first applicant was licensed in 1916? In fact, according to the State Medical Board, Ohio is also unique in that it defines massage therapy as a “limited branch of the practice of medicine.”

© Nicole K. Ftacnik, LMT, CPNMT

For an interesting article on the history of massage licensure, please read Massage Therapy Licensing: An In-Depth Look.

This career is no longer bound by myths such as “work of the Devil” or “prostitution”, this career is a legitimate career with legitimate therapists who are proud of their work and that fully support the regulation of their career.

I’m all about rules and regulations when it comes to helping the public via therapeutic touch, and am very interested to see how the massage therapy field continues to change as we move forward in time.

As always, I hope you find this information informative!

 

More On Myofascial Trigger Points (TrP’s)

Back in May of this year, I posted an article titled Trigger Points (TrP’s) In Detail and thought I would take it a step further by describing additional TrP’s that I learned about via the Precision Neural Mobilization seminar I attended. Before I list them however, please allow me to give you some other details.

1) TrP’s may be caused by several factors, including acute or chronic muscle overload, activation by other TrP’s, disease, psychological distress, homeostatic imbalances, direct trauma to the region, accident trauma, radiculopathy, and infections/health issues.

2) TrP’s form only in muscles—as a local contraction in a small number of muscle fibers located within in a larger muscle or muscle bundle. They can pull on tendons and ligaments associated with the muscle, which in turn, can cause pain deep within a joint where there are no muscles. They can also cause muscle weakness.

3) TrP referral patterns follow specific nerve pathways and have been readily mapped—thanks to Travell & Simons—to aid in the identification of pain. Many TrP’s have pain patterns that overlap, and some create reciprocal cyclic relationships.

4) A taut band in muscles containing TrP’s can feel like hard nodules. Upon palpation, a twitch response can often be felt; activateing the “all or nothing” response in a muscle that causes it to contract. Pressing on an affected muscle can often refer pain, and clusters of TrP’s are not uncommon in some in larger muscles (i.e. the gluteus group).

As promised, here is a list of TrP’s above and beyond what I gave you the last time; the first three being what was listed in my previous post…

  • Active – A TrP that causes a clinical pain complaint. It is always tender; prevents full lengthening of a muscle; weakens a muscle; activates a local twitch response when stimulated; direct compression refers patient-recognized pain that is generally in it’s pain reference zone. (Click here for a website that lists reference zones and pain referral patterns.)
  • Latent – A TrP that is clinically inactive with respect to spontaneous pain; painful only when palpated. It may have all other characteristics of an active TrP and always has a taut band that increases muscle tension and restricts range of motion (ROM).
  • Satellite – A TrP that is influenced neurogenically or mechanically by the activity of a key TrP.
  • Associated – A TrP in one muscle that develops in response to compensatory overload, a shortened position, or referred phenomena cause by TrP activity in another muscle. Satellite and secondary TrP’s are types of associated TrP’s.
  • Attachement – A TrP at the musculotendinous junction and/or at the osseous attachment of a muscle that identifies the enthesopathy caused by unrelieved tension, characteristic of the taut band that is produced by a central TrP.
  • Central – A TrP that is closely associated with dysfunctional end-plates and is located near the center of muscle fibers.
  • Key – A TrP responsible for activating one or more TrP’s.
  • Primary – A central TrP that is activated by acute or chronic overload, or repetitive overuse of a muscle in which it occurs, and was not activated as a result of TrP activity in another muscle.

The misdiagnosis of pain is the most important issue taken up by Travell and Simons. Referred pain from trigger points mimics the symptoms of a very long list of common maladies, but physicians, in weighing all the possible causes for a given condition, rarely consider a myofascial source. The study of trigger points has not historically been part of medical education. Travell and Simons hold that most of the common everyday pain is caused by myofascial trigger points and that ignorance of that basic concept could inevitably lead to false diagnoses and the ultimate failure to deal effectively with pain.

The above quote comes from a workbook titled The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook. With this book, you will learn about TrP’s and how to treat them; however, it is important for you to keep in mind that if your muscular-skeletal system is misaligned, other muscles are affected, which in my opinion, makes it hard to self-treat in a way that is more than just temporary. Every little bit helps though!

As always, I hope you find this information informative!

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“Neutral balance alignment is key to becoming pain free!”™ ~ Me